Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on LinkedIn
People

Return

Click to return to
the "Team and Fellows" page

 

 

 

The late science-fiction author Philip K. Dick (The Man in the High Castle, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner), The Minority Report, VALIS ) acknowledged Mr. Cowan as “a new and original thinker.”

Mr. Cowan is the recipient of the National Public Health Award (for his work to end violence) and the Award for Excellence in Human Resources.

 

 

 

 

Ari Cowan  

Ari Cowan

Ari Cowan is the Director General of the International Center for Compassionate Organizations (ICCO). He focuses on the continuing development of the International Center and coordinating its overall day-to-day operations. He is also the key author of the theoretical principles of the International Center as well as a participant in developing, delivering, and evaluating the International Center's programs, publications, partnerships, and initiatives.

For his work to end violence, Mr. Cowan received the (Broad Street Pump) National Public Health Award from the United States affiliate of the international physician organization that received the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Cowan's award was made in recognition of his work on behalf of children and families and in recognition of his “outstanding activism, steadfast commitment, and passion for a better world.” He also received the Professionals in Human Resources Association's Award for Excellence in Human Resources, the highest award granted by that organization.

He was cited — along with Nobel Prize recipient and former President Jimmy Carter and 1980 Nobel Prize recipient Adolfo Pérez Esquivel (among others) — for his assistance in bringing the first public edition of The International Bill of Human Rights to publication.

As a theorist, he developed the Violence Integrative Prevention and Restoration (PAR) Model, the Integrative Conflict Management Model (ICM2) and the Integrative Power Management Model (IPM2) — new, evidence-based, cognitive approaches to dealing with challenging human relationships. They share common theoretical elements, all of which are built upon a public health foundation. His theoretical work has been demonstrated in the United States and internationally.

Under a grant from the Fetzer Institute, Mr. Cowan established and served as the consulting Director of the International Institute for Compassionate Cities for the Compassionate Action Network International (now the Charter for Compassion). He has made presentations at the United Nations (compassionate governance), the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center, the international Empathy and Compassion in Society Conference (London, UK), and the International Summit Conference on Compassionate Organizations.

Mr. Cowan is the author of eight human resources/health benefits management reference works. He was a member of the adjunct faculty at the University of California, Irvine Graduate School of Management (Irvine, California) for eight years and served as a member of the Workplace Violence Task Force of the University of Washington Graduate School of Public Affairs, Institute for Public Policy and Management.

Mr. Cowan spent seven years working in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) group settings with many adults in treatment for severe violence in childhood.

He displayed his photographic work at the 1974 World's Fair; served as a film reviewer for The Daily Journal-American newspaper in Bellevue, Washington; and spent two years as the film reviewer on the Seattle PBS television affiliate. The late science-fiction author Philip K. Dick (The Man in the High Castle, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner), The Minority Report, VALIS) acknowledged Mr. Cowan as “a new and original thinker.”

Contact | Privacy | Terms of Use
  The International Center for Compassionate Organizations is a nonprofit, public health, and public service organization
working to foster the value and practice of compassion in organizations worldwide.
Copyright ©2017 by the International Center for Compassionate Organizations. All rights reserved.